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Welcome to the new SAFRING website.

To log into the site, use your email address and EITHER your ADU number or your SAFRING number. The password is the same password used for all ADU projects.

If you do not have a password, follow this link to generate one for your account.

SAFRING's mission: SAFRING is based at the University of Cape Town and provides bird ringing services in South Africa and other African countries. This entails providing ringing equipment to qualified ringers, and curating all ringing data. SAFRING communicates with ringers and interested parties through annually publishing one or two issues of a newsletter, Afring News, and by maintaining a list server. SAFRING holds national training courses, annually if there is sufficient demand. SAFRING liases with the provinces who have the responsibility of issuing permits. SAFRING has a strict code of ethics to ensure the safety of birds handled. SAFRING acknowledges the importance of bird ringing in that it has been described as the most important tool in ornithology in the 20th century.

The South African Bird Ringing Unit (SAFRING) administers bird ringing in southern Africa, supplying rings, ringing equipment and services to volunteer and professional ringers in South Africa and neighbouring countries. All ringing records are curated by SAFRING, which is an essential arm of the Animal Demography Unit. Contact is maintained by the SAFRING Project Coordinator with all ringers (banders in North American or Australian terminology).


Recovery of 2 old sea birds
Carvern Jacobs (2014-04-01)

On the 21st of March Peter Dawson recovered a dead bird (955066), 400 Metres East of Swartvlei Beach Car Park, Sedgefield, Western Cape. Peter, read the inscription on the ring “Inform SAFRING University of Cape Town” and as per usual with all re-traps and recoveries the information made its way to the SAFRING mailbox. This particular bird was a Cape gannet, ringed as a chick in 1984 at Bird Island, Algoa Bay. Amazingly this bird was re-sighted after 30 years and 17 days and travelled a distance of 670 km.

 

 

Another interesting find was that of a Swift tern (527246) which was found on the 30th of March.  Hilton Johnson stumbled on this particular bird while walking on the beach, east of the Sundays River Mouth, Eastern Cape. This Swift tern was ringed as a chick in 1983 at Marcus Island (Causeway), Saldanha, Western Cape. It also travelled a distance of 670 km, but in the opposite direction with a longevity record 30 years 12 months and 17 days.

Sighting of the oldest Common Tern (Sterna hirundo) in the world!!!
Carvern Jacobs (2014-03-26)

On the ninth of March 2014, Mark Boorman one of SAFRING’s hard core ringers spotted a Common Tern with Finnish ring AT055395. Luckily for us Mark spotted this bird while out in the field at Walvis Bay oyster beds, Namibia. He immediately contacted the Finnish ringing scheme. They verified that this was indeed one of their birds which were ringed as a chick in 1980.

 

Wow wow!! This re-sighting makes it the oldest living Common Tern in the world to date, with a longevity record of 33 years 7 months and 24 days. The previous oldest traceable record (Euring) is of a UK bird, CK39045, which was 33 years when it’s ring was read in the field. The oldest longevity record for a Common Tern in the SAFRING database is that of H96811 (Euring), 25 years and 3 months.

Apart from being the oldest Common Tern it flew a distance of 9,483.51 km from its place of origin in Hirvensalo, Finland to Namibia where it was sighted. It is quite common for these sea birds to travel vast distances while migrating between breeding ranges in Europe and wintering ranges in coastal tropical and subtropical regions in Africa and South America. 

Citizen Science Week : Saturday 8 March to Sunday 16 March
Les Underhill (2014-03-02)

Citizen Science Week 8-16 March

Ultimately, the goal of all the data collection by the ADU's citizen scientists is to have an impact on biodiversity conservation. The wealth of data and information contributed by our citizen scientists, collated and curated at the ADU, and analysed by our students and staff and by many other people, has improved biodiversity conservation in southern Africa. Together we are making a difference! For the evidence of this have a look at this one-page article.

The ADU's Citizen Science Week celebrates the participation and involvement of citizen scientists in building our digital biodiversity databases, totalling some 18 million records. The objective of our "Citizen Science Week" is to give all citizen scientists a chance to become a community with the objective of collecting and submitting as much biodiversity data in digital format as we are able during the week. Citizen Science Week runs from Saturday 8 March to Sunday 16 March, so it includes two weekends.

Citizen Science Week, 8-16 March
Carvern Jacobs (2014-02-26)

It would be wonderful if all SAFRING ringers could make a special effort to go ringing during Citizen Science Week, 8-16 March, and take some people with them who have never had this experience.

Ultimately, the goal of all the data collection by the ADU’s citizen scientists is to have an impact on biodiversity conservation. The wealth of data and information contributed by our citizen scientists, collated and curated at the ADU, and analysed by our students and staff and by many other people, has improved biodiversity conservation in southern Africa. Together we are making a difference! To learn more about the impact our citizen scientists have had, take a look at http://internal.adu.org.za/upload/uploads/1221_ADU_African_Birdlife_14-0102.JPG

Citizen Science Week celebrates the participation and involvement of citizen scientists in building our digital biodiversity databases, totalling some 18 million records. The objective of our "Citizen Science Week" is to give all citizen scientists a chance to become a community with the objective of collecting and submitting as much biodiversity data in digital format as we are able during the week. Citizen Science Week runs from Saturday 8 March to Sunday 16 March, so it includes two weekends.

~ Les Underhill

Prepub Offer: "The Ultimate Companion for Birding in Southern Africa"
Les Underhill (2014-01-23)

The Ultimate Companion for Birding in Southern Africa

The distribution maps in "The Ultimate Companion for Birding in Southern Africa" were generated in the ADU using SABAP data. You can get the book on a prepublication offer – it is a two-volume set – the prepub price, until 28 February, is R1248.30 (incl VAT and postage in South Africa). You have to work really hard to find the place where to put in the Promotional Code: if you slot in the promotional code ADU1234, then the publishers will give the ADU R100 for each copy sold. SO WHEN YOU ORDER THE BOOK, PLEASE SEARCH UNTIL YOU FIND THE PLACE TO SLOT THIS INFORMATION IN!

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tel. +27 (21) 650 4751 email. michael.brooks[@]uct.ac.za